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SO SAD TO FALL IN BATTLE
 
The Battle of Iwo Jima has been memorialized innumerable times as the subject of countless books and motion pictures, most recently Clint Eastwood’s films Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima, and no wartime photo is more famous than Joe Rosenthal’s Pulitzer Prize-winning image of Marines raising the flag on Mount Suribachi. Yet most Americans know only one side of this pivotal and bloody battle. First published in Japan to great acclaim, becoming a bestseller and a prize-winner, So Sad to Fall in Battle shows us the struggle, through the eyes of Japanese commander Tadamichi Kuribayashi, one of the most fascinating and least-known figures of World War II.

As author Kumiko Kakehashi demonstrates, Kuribayashi was far from the stereotypical fanatic Japanese warrior. Unique among his country’s officers, he refused to risk his men’s lives in suicidal banzai attacks, instead creating a defensive, insurgent style of combat that eventually became the Japanese standard. On Iwo Jima, he eschewed the special treatment due to him as an officer, enduring the same difficult conditions as his men, and personally walked every inch of the island to plan the positions of thousands of underground bunkers and tunnels. The very flagpole used in the renowned photograph was a pipe from a complex water collection system the general himself engineered.

Exclusive interviews with survivors reveal that as the tide turned against him, Kuribayashi displayed his true mettle: Though offered a safer post on another island, he chose to stay with his men, fighting alongside them in a final, fearless, and ultimately hopeless three-hour siege.

After thirty-six cataclysmic days on Iwo Jima, Kuribayashi’s troops were responsible for the deaths of a third of all U.S. Marines killed during the entire four-year Pacific conflict, making him, in the end, America’s most feared–and respected–foe. Ironically, it was Kuribayashi’s own memories of his military training in America in the 1920s, and his admiration for this country’s rich, gregarious, and self-reliant people, that made him fear ever facing them in combat–a feeling that some suspect prompted his superiors to send him to Iwo Jima, where he met his fate.

Along with the words of his son and daughter, which offer unique insight into the private man, Kuribayashi’s own letters cited extensively in this book paint a stirring portrait of the circumstances that shaped him. So Sad to Fall in Battle tells a fascinating, never-before-told story and introduces America, as if for the first time, to one of its most worthy adversaries.


240 pages, hardcover
Presidio Press
So Sad to Fall in Battle
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IN THE POOL
 
A divorced man angry at his wife finds a painfully prominent outlet in a permanent erection; a model thinks every man on the street is a stalker; an overbearing magazine editor relieves his mid-life crisis by long-distance swimming . . . These are some of the patients who descend to the basement consulting room of Doctor Ichiro Irabu, an obese, eccentric neurologist with an injection fetish, an Oedipus complex, and a pea-green Porsche. A collection of five wacky stories, Hideo Okuda’s In the Pool exposes the many faces of dysfunction in modern Japan.

208 pages, hardcover
Stone Bridge Press/IBC
In the Pool
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ISHIBASHI SHOJIRO, ART COLLECTOR
 
Say the word Bridgestone and most people think of car tires. Less well known is the fact that Shojiro Ishibashi, the founder of the world-famous company, also built up one of Japan’s largest private collections of modern Japanese and Western art during a few short years on either side of World War II. Created to accompany a 2002 exhibition marking the fiftieth anniversary of the Bridgestone Museum of Art in Tokyo, this book provides an overview of Ishibashi’s life, a detailed account of the formation of his collection, and a variety of interesting biographical material including photographs not only of his artworks, but of his magnificent private residences.
Ishibashi Shojiro
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TOKYO FRAGMENTS
 
Tokyo Fragments is a collection of short stories that were specially commissioned from five of Japan's leading contemporary writers of fiction. The individual tales, which are designed to merge to form a composite portrait of modern Tokyo, present the city and its inhabitants in all their variety, from dropout students sniffing glue in the sleaze of Shinjuku to social climbers playing at love in glitzy Aoyama.
Tokyo Fragments includes stories by Chiya Fujino, winner of the Akutagawa prize in 1999, as well as Mariko Hayashi, Makoto Shiina, Tomomi Muramatsu and Ryuji Morita.

206 pages, Hardcover
IBC Publishing
Tokyo Fragments
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THE LAST FLIGHT HOME
 
Published in Japanese in 1987 when the bubble economy was in full swing, The Last Flight Home was Mariko Hayashi's breakout work. Though it is women who are the protagonists in all five stories in this collection, not one of them conforms to the docile and saccharine Japanese archetype. Calculating and manipulative, disingenuous and overbearing, Hayashi's female characters live in a world where scheming and deception always seethe just below the surface.
Note that although this book was published for Japanese students of English, the text has not been simplified in anyway.

242 pages, Paperback
IBC Publishing
The Last Flight Home
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SUBWAY LOVE
 
For a period of almost ten years, from 1963 until 1972, the young Nobuyoshi Araki obsessively photographed fellow passengers during his daily trips to and from work on the Tokyo subway. Yawning businessmen, dozing women, children who guessed what he was up to and mugged for the camera - Araki captured them all on film. His candid black and white portraits, shot without using the viewfinder, record Tokyoites of the '60s and '70s in all their vitality and variety.
Subway Love also includes an interview with Araki explaining what he regards as the essence of documentary - 'to gaze unflinchingly at a thing for a long time.'

226 pages, Paperback
IBC Publishing
Subway Love
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ARAKI BY ARAKI
 
Araki by Araki is a record of the work of Nobuyoshi Araki, self-styled 'photomaniac' and permanent enfant terrible of the Japanese art world. Published to mark the artist's sixty-third birthday, this volume features 2002 pictures covering his entire career from 1963 to 2002. Sex-trade voyeur, recorder of Tokyo cityscapes, chronicler of married life, or experimental photo artist - no matter what your image of Araki, this collection will reveal new aspects of his talent, as it traces his unique vision over 40 prolific years. The book includes an original commentary by Araki, who speaks with a unique voice, somewhere between Austin Powers and Keith Moon.

408 Pages, Full color, Paperback
Kodansha International
ARAKI
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The Twelve Men Who Made Japan
Sakaiya Taichi started out as an elite civil servant in Japan's Ministry of Trade and Industry, before establishing himself as an author of novels, history and business books in the late 1970s. The Twelve Men Who Made Japan is Sakaiya's take on the men who created the social institutions of Japan and exerted the greatest influence on the national psyche. His selection includes fictional characters such as Hikaru Genji (from The Tale of Genji) whom Sakaiya regards as the archetype of the effete aristocrats who led the country into World War II; business leaders like Matsushita Konosuke, founder of Matsushita electronic Industries and originator of the lifetime employment system; even General Douglas MacArthur. Sakaiya seeks to link the habits of thought inculcated by the twelve men to the economic malaise that bedevilled Japan throughout 1990s. This book was specially translated for a course of lectures given by Sakaiya at Yale in the 2003 winter semester.

288 Pages Bilingual Book (Paperback)
Kodansha International
The Twelve Men Who Made Japan
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Master Modeler: Creating the Tamiya Style
Translated from the Japanese bestseller, Master Modeler tells the story of how Shunsaku Tamiya turned a debt-ridden lumber business into the world's leading manufacturer of model kits.
During his childhood in wartime Japan, Tamiya was obsessed with American fighter planes. It was he who persuaded his father to diversify from selling building lumber into the manufacture of wooden models in the late 1950s; and it was his stubbornness and fanatical attention to detail that made Tamiya into the most highly regarded model manufacturer in the world.
This frank autobiography covers all the highs and lows of Tamiya's progress: the obsessive research behind the hit models; the commercial triumphs like the original Panther tank, military miniatures, F1 racers and MINI 4WD cars; inside stories on the development of revolutionary products like electric R/C motors; and the rare failures, like the early Battleship Musashi.
This is the story of an inspired hobbyist who turned his private passion into a multi-million dollar business.

244 Pages
Hardcover with Color Photographs
Kodansha International

LINK: Tamiya.com
Master Modeler
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All You Wanted to Know about the UK
 
Written by Giles Murray and translated into Japanese by Satsuki Kujo, All You Wanted to Know ... provides an overview of British life.
A freakish mixture of hard fact and rank subjectivity, the book is divided into nine sections covering everything from sports and entertainment to politics and royalty. Do British people ever have sex? What is the British class system? What is the difference between British and American pop music? Why is British food so bad? What exactly are football hooligans? Why was Princess Diana so popular? How did the British Empire develop? Are the British really a nation of tea addicts? All these weighty questions glibly answered in less than 250 pages.

234 pages, Paperback
Bilingual Book Series
Kodansha International
All You Wanted to Know about the UK
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A Statistical Look at Japan
 
Originally published in Japanese as Suji de Yomu Nihonjin, this abbreviated bilingual version of Shogo Mizoe's book provides a numbers-based look at every aspect of Japanese society.
The Japanese believe in statistics. In this single volume, you can learn everything you ever wanted to know about the country: How frequently do couples in Tokyo have sex? By how much has the divorce rate risen since World War II? Do the Japanese live longer than other people? Do they work longer hours than any other developed nation? How does the Japanese murder rate compare with other societies? Graphs, charts and diagrams enhance the digestibility of this data-feast.

279 pages
Bilingual Book Series
Kodansha International
A Statistical Look at Japan
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